WORK

 

Pavement Studies 

The ongoing fusion and separation of everything

Meandering rivers, moving mountains and evolving clouds 

Like the progress of our daily life The never-ending development

of our pavements, streets and buildings

The surrounding that we 

constantly create and change

A fragile construction of reality Breathless, thoroughly calculated and unconsciously blacked out 

at the same time

Having studied illustration at an art academy and been into narration in book form, I am now searching for another way of exploring space, working with paintings. I‘m see-king for a direct, non-verbal expression of what I want to tell. I started working like this about two years ago and  I am at the beginning of a long journey. 

My abstract paintings are built of amorphous forms, so-metimes floating and sometimes stuck on the background, reminding of puzzles for children. The mixed techniques (spray can, arcyl, oil pastels, textiles), which are applied onto paper, paperboard or wood, build up an evolution of levels and textures. The whole working process, each and every brushstroke, shape, layer and material can be seen in the final piece. Even elements that get painted over remain visible. 

They all witness my interest in the most fundamental element which is easily overlooked: The ground beneath our feet. Every picture is a portrait of a certain geografical structure; an overhead top view, not revealing if it shows distant or close settings. A limbo of near and far, clarity of the uncertainty, pulsation of life. 

My works allow the simultaneous impression of a close and far look on something that seems to be landscape and organism at the same time. To put it in a broader context that excites me in this regard: a comparable phenomenon is known in philosophy and the social and natural scien-ces under the name „self-similarity“. It is the property of objects, bodies, quantities, or geometric objects to exhibit the same or similar structures at larger scales (i.e., when magnified) as they do in their initial state. 

The most honest intention in my work is not only to illustrate scientific insights but to be close to people. The works exist to radiate warmth and rootedness, something sheltered. They say: »Hey you! Come closer. Don‘t worry, let go of all worries, everything is good here.« They are loving, con-fident images. They are meant to ground people, to lead them to themselves and their peace, to have a balancing effect on them.